AIPP’s Latest Publications

UN Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples On Customary Laws

Even to this day, Thakali people in Nepal’s Mustang valley swear on holy water from Kali Gandaki River to resolve disputes in the presence of Mukhiya (local chief). For serious disputes, a holy assembly (Dharmasava) is convened whereby people wear on their holy book Dhorchecho. Only two cases have been filed in Mustang’s state court – and they are from other communities Based on Purna Prasad Tulachan’s case study, Asia Indigenous People’s Perspectives on Development   Indigenous Peoples have the right to maintain and strengthen their own political, legal, social and cultural Institutions while retaining their right to fully participate ...

Briefing paper on REDD+, Rights and Indigenous Peoples: Lessons from REDD+ Initiatives in Asia

The idea of including ‘reducing emissions from deforestation in developing countries’ in the global climate change negotiations was first presented by the Coalition for Rainforest Nations in 2005, at the UNFCCC’s 11th Conference of the Parties in Montreal, Canada. Five years later, in 2010, REDD was part of the agreements reached at the 16th COP in Cancun Mexico. During these five years REDD has evolved considerably. While the original idea behind REDD was to pay forest owners for preventing deforestation and thus reduce carbon emissions, the Cancun Agreement broadened the scope of REDD to include both actions that prevent emissions ...

[Comic Book] The Forest is Life: Knowledge for Communities

Climate change is a commonly discussed issue nowadays, and has become an environmental problem-affecting people throughout the world. Climate change is resulting in shifting weather patterns and other global effects such as unseasonal rains that affect agriculture, droughts, increased temperatures, floods, plagues and diseases. Global warming is mainly the result of rising CO2 level in the earth’s atmosphere. Scientists say about 17% to 20% of the global CO2 emissions are a result of deforestation and degradation of the forests. This comic book provides information on climate change and REDDS (Reducing Emission from Deforestation and forest Degradation in developing countries), which ...

Indigenous Peoples and Corporate Accountability in the ASEAN

Indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia live in areas rich in natural resources. These areas have become targets of resource extraction and development projects by multinational companies. Indigenous communities are confronted with the adverse impacts of mining, logging, large-scale plantations and infrastructure programs. These projects are generally implemented without the consultation and consent of affected communities. Massive displacement of indigenous peoples, the loss of their livelihood and the denigration on of their culture and identity are just some of the adverse effects of these projects. Due to the increasing and expanding operations of multinational corporations in indigenous peoples’ territories, the Asia ...

Training Manual on Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) in REDD+ for Indigenous Peoples

This Training Manual on Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) in REDD+ for Indigenous Peoples is the third in a series of four manuals after What is REDD?, What to do with REDD?, and Understanding Community-based REDD+. The first two publications (i.e., What is REDD and What to do with REDD?) were focused on raising awareness of indigenous communities for a better understanding of the concept of REDD+, on what the possible impacts and opportunities of REDD+ are, and how to protect their rights in REDD+ processes and mechanisms. The manual on Understanding Community-based REDD+, on the other hand, focused ...

Briefing Paper: Indigenous Peoples and Climate Change Adaptation in Asia

It is estimated that there are 350-400 million indigenous peoples in the world; two-thirds of them live in Asia1. However, it is difficult to give an accurate total number of the population of indigenous peoples because many are not recognized and reflected in national censuses in Asia. Indigenous peoples are some of the most impoverished, marginalized and vulnerable peoples in the world and are also the most affected by climate change impacts and its uncertainties. In general, most of the indigenous peoples inhabit marginal and fragile ecosystems, such as tropical and temperate forest zones, low-lying coastlines, high mountainous areas, flood ...

What is REDD? A Guide for Indigenous Communities (3rd Edition)

Global efforts are currently underway to protect and restore forests as part of global initiatives to address and mitigate climate change. These efforts are formally referred to as REDD plus – (REDD+, or Reduced Emissions from Deforestation, forest Degradation, conservation, sustainable management of forests, and enhancement of forest carbon stocks in developing countries) and are considered by many as a historic opportunity for forest conservation. Critics point at the complexity of REDD+ and its inherent difficulties, predicting it to fail. Others, however, already consider REDD a “remarkable achievement” since the idea of REDD has been taken “to the point where ...

[LATEST INFO POSTER] UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples on Self-Determination

“Until our right to self- determination is recognized, the struggle will not end. Even if it means the sacrifice of our lives to achieve freedom, so be it!” – Rafael Markus Bangit, Cordillera martyr (Victim of extrajudicial killings in the Philippines in 2006) Indigenous peoples have the right to self-determination, which means that they freely decide their political status, and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural development. This right to freely determine its political status includes the right to define its mode of associating with an existing state, and the right to self-government of peoples to govern themselves without ...

Hydropower Development and Right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) of Indigenous Peoples – Case Studies from Nepal and Northeast India

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AIPP, with local partner organizations, conducted studies on Mapithel (Thoubal Multipurpose) Dam Project in Manipur, Northeast India and Likhu-4 Hydropower Project in Nepal in 2008 and 2010 respectively in order to examine the impacts of these projects on local indigenous peoples. Reports of the two case studies describe religious and socio-cultural, economic, linguistic and ecological aspects of the effects from the projects on local Tangkhul and Koits indigenous communities, mainly in relation to their right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent. Click here to read the full report of Nepal case study. Click here to read the full report of ...

VIOLENCE, CUSTOMARY LAW AND INDIGENOUS WOMEN’S RIGHTS IN ASIA

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It is now widely recognized that the majority of the world’s indigenous peoples live in Asia, and that Asia therefore also holds the world’s most diverse indigenous population. Collated rough country level estimates for South, Southeast and East Asia lead us to conclude that indigenous peoples may number as many as, or even more than, 260 million people. Comprised of hundreds of ethnic groups with their own distinct languages, cultures, social organizations and livelihood systems, Asia’s indigenous peoples are harbouring a large share of the world’s cultural diversity. The particular religion, culture, livelihood system and social organization of a people ...