Case Studies

Indigenous Peoples and Corporate Accountability in the ASEAN

Indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia live in areas rich in natural resources. These areas have become targets of resource extraction and development projects by multinational companies. Indigenous communities are confronted with the adverse impacts of mining, logging, large-scale plantations and infrastructure programs. These projects are generally implemented without the consultation and consent of affected communities. Massive displacement of indigenous peoples, the loss of their livelihood and the denigration on of their culture and identity are just some of the adverse effects of these projects. Due to the increasing and expanding operations of multinational corporations in indigenous peoples’ territories, the Asia ...

Hydropower Development and Right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) of Indigenous Peoples – Case Studies from Nepal and Northeast India

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AIPP, with local partner organizations, conducted studies on Mapithel (Thoubal Multipurpose) Dam Project in Manipur, Northeast India and Likhu-4 Hydropower Project in Nepal in 2008 and 2010 respectively in order to examine the impacts of these projects on local indigenous peoples. Reports of the two case studies describe religious and socio-cultural, economic, linguistic and ecological aspects of the effects from the projects on local Tangkhul and Koits indigenous communities, mainly in relation to their right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent. Click here to read the full report of Nepal case study. Click here to read the full report of ...

Customary Law in Forest Resources Use and Management – A Case Study among the Dzao and Thai People in North-West Vietnam

Vietnam is home to 53 ethnic minority groups who mostly live in the forested uplands. Numbering over twelve million people, they highly depend on forests for their livelihood and development. But the pressures on these forests are ever increasing, posing a serious threat to the lives and stability of millions of people. Since the early 1990s, Vietnam has attempted to address deforestation by decentralizing forest management. Under the forest land allocation programme long-term use rights over forest land are provided to individual households and communities. However, while the programme has been successful in improving forest conservation, the benefits of the ...

Divers Paths to Justice – Legal pluralism and the rights of indigenous peoples in Southeast Asia

Marcus Colchester & Sophie Chao (Eds) with Ramy Bulan, Jennifer Corpuz, Amity Doolittle, Devasish Roy, Myrna Safitri, Gam Shimray and Prasert Trakansuphakon   Asia Indigenous Peoples Pact (AIPP), Forest Peoples Programme (FPP), RECOFTC – The Center for People and Forests & Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI)   26 November, 2011 The forests of Southeast Asia are home to many tens of millions of people whose rights to their lands and forests are only weakly secured in national constitutions and laws. Yet many of them have dwelt in these areas since before the nation states in which they now find themselves ...

Global Warming Scapegoat: A New Punishment Measure Imposed on Indigenous Peoples for Practicing their Sustainable Traditional Livelihood Activities

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In a dramatic incident, the Government of Thailand arrested and penalized villagers in Northern Thailand with up to THB 3,181,500 (USD 96,409) and imprisonment for “causing deforestation and rise in temperature”. The villagers were clearing the fallow-fields in their traditional shifting cultivation area for their livelihood. They were penalized ignoring all scientific evidences that shifting cultivation does not make any significant contribution to global warming. In fact, recent studies show that fallow forest of shifting cultivation has a high capacity for carbon sequestration apart from contributing to diversity of forest types at the landscape level and thus overall biodiversity. Click ...

Hydropower Development and Right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) of Indigenous Peoples – Case Studies from Nepal and Northeast India

AIPP, with local pNepal_cover_pageartner organizations, conducted studies on Mapithel (Thoubal Multipurpose) Dam Project in Manipur, Northeast India and Likhu-4 Hydropower Project in Nepal in 2008 and 2010 respectively in order to examine the impacts of these projects on local indigenous peoples. Reports of the two case studies describe religious and socio-cultural, economic, linguistic and ecological aspects of the effects from the projects on local Tangkhul and Koits indigenous communities, mainly in relation to their right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent. Click here to download the full report of Mapithel Dam Project in Norteast India. Click here to download the full report of Likhu-4 ...

Climate Change, Trees and Livelihood: A Case Study on the Carbon Footprint of a Karen Community in Northern Thailand

Introduction Global climate change is increasingly affecting the agricultural sector of Thailand in various ways, manifested by worsening drought, floods, and irregular rainfall. All these are additional risks to livelihood activities, resources, food security, and thus may lead to an increase of poverty. Thailand ratified the UNFCCC on 28 December 1994 and ratified the Kyoto Protocol on 28 August 2002. The Office of Natural Resources and Environmental Policy and Plan (ON REP) has been designated as the national focal point on climate change under the UNFCCC. The Thai government designated the ON REP to draft a national master plan on ...

Indigenous Knowledge and Customary Law in Natural Resource Management

Introduction Lands and territories inhabited by most indigenous peoples across the globe are rich in natural resources. Through generations of experimentation and as custodians, the indig-enous peoples have developed an expansive body of knowledge for sustainable use and management of these resources. The continuity of this knowledge and sustainable use and management practices of these resources are enforced through rules, beliefs and taboos which form a part of their customary laws.

Traditional Livelihoods and Indigenous Peoples

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Most indigenous peoples have developed highly specialized livelihood strategies and occupations which include hunting, fishing, trapping, shifting cultivation or gathering food and forest products, handicrafts such as weaving, basketry, woodcarving among others, and rural and community based industries. In Asia, most indigenous peoples are primarily involved in small scale agriculture, fishing, hunting and gathering from nearby forests. Traditional occupations of indigenous peoples though, such as shifting cultivation, fishing and pastoralism are often not recognized by governments who regard these sustainable practices as outdayed and antiethical to “development”. Please click this link for detail! Please click the following link for : ...

India and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

India is home to the largest population of indigenous peoples of any country in the world. Roughly a quarter of the world’s indigenous population – around 80 million people – are scattered across India, their numbers a staggering diversity of ethnicities, cultures and socioeconomic situations. They range from some of the last uncontacted indigenous communities in the world, like the Sentinelese of the Andamans, to some of the largest, such as the Gonds and Santhals of central India. They include not only communities who live under conditions of extreme destitution, but also communities with social indicators well above the national ...